Title

Cyanidin-3-rutinoside stimulated insulin secretion through activation of L-type voltage-dependent Ca channels and the PLC-IP pathway in pancreatic β-cells

Authors

Phutthida Kongthitilerd, Interdisciplinary Program of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. Electronic address: phutthida.ko@gmail.com.
Thavaree Thilavech, Department of Food Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10440, Thailand. Electronic address: thavaree.thi@mahidol.ac.th.
Marisa Marnpae, The Halal Science Center, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Phytochemical and Functional Food Research Unit for Clinical Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. Electronic address: mmarisa.hsc@gmail.com.
Weiqiong Rong, Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. Electronic address: wrong1@lsu.edu.
Shaomian Yao, Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. Electronic address: shaomia@lsu.edu.
Sirichai Adisakwattana, Phytochemical and Functional Food Research Unit for Clinical Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. Electronic address: sirichai.a@chula.ac.th.
Henrique Cheng, Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. Electronic address: hcheng@lsu.edu.
Tanyawan Suantawee, Phytochemical and Functional Food Research Unit for Clinical Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. Electronic address: tanyawan.s@chula.ac.th.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2022

Abstract

Cyanidin-3-rutinoside (C3R) is an anthocyanin with anti-diabetic properties found in red-purple fruits. However, the molecular mechanisms of C3R on Ca-dependent insulin secretion remains unknown. This study aimed to identify C3R's mechanisms of action in pancreatic β-cells. Rat INS-1 cells were used to elucidate the effects of C3R on insulin secretion, intracellular Ca signaling, and gene expression. The results showed that C3R at 60, 100, and 300 µM concentrations significantly increased insulin secretion via intracellular Ca signaling. The exposure of cells with C3R concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect cell viability. Pretreatment of cells with nimodipine (voltage-dependent Ca channel (VDCC) blocker), U73122 (PLC inhibitor), and 2-APB (IP receptor blocker) inhibited the intracellular Ca signals by C3R. Interestingly, C3R increased intracellular Ca signals and insulin secretion after depletion of endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores by thapsigargin. However, insulin secretion was abolished under extracellular Ca-free conditions. Moreover, C3R upregulated mRNA expression for Glut2 and Kir genes. These findings indicate that C3R stimulated insulin secretion by promoting Ca influx via VDCCs and activating the PLC-IP pathway. C3R also upregulates the expression of genes necessary for glucose-induced insulin secretion. This is the first study describing the molecular mechanisms by which C3R stimulates Ca-dependent insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. These findings contribute to our understanding on how anthocyanins improve hyperglycemia in diabetic patients.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Biomedicine & pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine & pharmacotherapie

First Page

112494

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