Title

Characterization of Aerosols of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Following Three Generation Methods Using an Optimized Aerosolization System Designed for Experimental Inhalation Studies

Authors

Igor Pujalté, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Chair in Toxicological Risk Assessment and Management, and University of Montreal Public Health, Research Institute (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, Roger-Gaudry Building, U424, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. igor.pujalte@umontreal.ca.
Alessandra Serventi, Institute of Research of Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, QC J3X 1S1, Canada. serventi.alessandra-maria@ireq.ca.
Alexandra Noël, Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. lexy_noel@yahoo.com.
Denis Dieme, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Chair in Toxicological Risk Assessment and Management, and University of Montreal Public Health, Research Institute (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, Roger-Gaudry Building, U424, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. denis.dieme@umontreal.ca.
Sami Haddad, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Chair in Toxicological Risk Assessment and Management, and University of Montreal Public Health, Research Institute (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, Roger-Gaudry Building, U424, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. sami.haddad@umontreal.ca.
Michèle Bouchard, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Chair in Toxicological Risk Assessment and Management, and University of Montreal Public Health, Research Institute (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, Roger-Gaudry Building, U424, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. michele.bouchard@umontreal.ca.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2017

Abstract

Nanoparticles (NPs) can be released in the air in work settings, but various factors influence the exposure of workers. Controlled inhalation experiments can thus be conducted in an attempt to reproduce real-life exposure conditions and assess inhalation toxicology. Methods exist to generate aerosols, but it remains difficult to obtain nano-sized and stable aerosols suitable for inhalation experiments. The goal of this work was to characterize aerosols of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) NPs, generated using a novel inhalation system equipped with three types of generators-a wet collision jet nebulizer, a dry dust jet and an electrospray aerosolizer-with the aim of producing stable aerosols with a nano-diameter average (<100 nm) and monodispersed distribution for future rodent exposures and toxicological studies. Results showed the ability of the three generation systems to provide good and stable dispersions of NPs, applicable for acute (continuous up to 8 h) and repeated (21-day) exposures. In all cases, the generated aerosols were composed mainly of small aggregates/agglomerates (average diameter <100 nm) with the electrospray producing the finest (average diameter of 70-75 mm) and least concentrated aerosols (between 0.150 and 2.5 mg/m³). The dust jet was able to produce concentrations varying from 1.5 to 150 mg/m³, and hence, the most highly concentrated aerosols. The nebulizer collision jet aerosolizer was the most versatile generator, producing both low (0.5 mg/m³) and relatively high concentrations (30 mg/m³). The three optimized generators appeared suited for possible toxicological studies of inhaled NPs.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Toxics

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS