Title

An antimatter spectrometer in space

Authors

S. Ahlen, Boston University
V. M. Balebanov, Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences
R. Battiston, Università degli Studi di Perugia
U. Becker, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
J. Burger, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
M. Capell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
H. F. Chen, Boston University
H. S. Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
M. Chen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
N. Chernoplekov, Kurchatov (I.V.) Inst. of Atomic Energy
R. Clare, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
T. S. Dai, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
A. De Rujula, Boston University
P. Fisher, Johns Hopkins University
Yu Galaktionov, Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics
A. Gougas, Johns Hopkins University
Gu Wen-Qi, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences
M. He, Shandong University
V. Koutsenko, Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics
A. Lebedev, Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics
T. P. Li, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
Y. S. Lu, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
D. Luckey, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Y. Ma, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
R. McNeil, Louisiana State University
R. Orava, Helsinki Institute of Physics
A. Prevsner, Johns Hopkins University
V. Plyaskine, Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics
H. Rubinstein, Uppsala Universitet
R. Sagdeev, University of Maryland, College Park
M. Salamon, The University of Utah
H. W. Tang, Institute of High Energy Physics Chinese Academy of Science
S. C.C. Ting, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-15-1994

Abstract

We discuss a simple magnetic spectrometer to be installed on a satellite or space station. The purpose of this spectrometer is to search for primordial antimatter to the level of antimatter/matter ≈10-9, improving the existing limits obtained with balloon flights by a factor of 104 to 105. The design of the spectrometer is based on an iron-free, NdFeB permanent magnet, scintillation counters, drift tubes, and silicon or time projection chambers. Different design options are discussed. Typically, the spectrometer has a weight of about 2 tons and an acceptance of about 1.0 m2 sr. The availability of the new NdFeB material makes it possible for the first time to put a magnet into space economically and reliably. © 1994.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A

First Page

351

Last Page

367

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