Title

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

Authors

B. Abbott, California Institute of Technology
R. Abbott, LIGO Livingston
R. Adhikari, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
A. Ageev, Lomonosov Moscow State University
B. Allen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
R. Amin, University of Florida
S. B. Anderson, California Institute of Technology
W. G. Anderson, University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College
M. Araya, California Institute of Technology
H. Armandula, California Institute of Technology
F. Asiri, California Institute of Technology
P. Aufmuth, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover
C. Aulbert, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute)
S. Babak, Cardiff University
R. Balasubramanian, Cardiff University
S. Ballmer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
B. C. Barish, California Institute of Technology
D. Barker, LIGO Hanford
C. Barker-Patton, LIGO Hanford
M. Barnes, California Institute of Technology
B. Barr, University of Glasgow
M. A. Barton, California Institute of Technology
K. Bayer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
R. Beausoleil, Stanford University
K. Belczynski, Northwestern University
R. Bennett, University of Glasgow
S. J. Berukoff, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute)
J. Betzwieser, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
B. Bhawal, California Institute of Technology
I. A. Bilenko, Lomonosov Moscow State University
G. Billingsley, California Institute of Technology
E. Black, California Institute of Technology
K. Blackburn, California Institute of Technology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2004

Abstract

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at a 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain [Formula Presented] typical sensitivities lie in the range [Formula Presented] depending on the waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors. © 2004 The American Physical Society.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology

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