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Abstract

Driven by sociocultural theories, First Author, Maggie conducted a critical action research study of her attempts to enact culturally relevant practices in a Response to Intervention (RtI) reading group. A grounded theory approach informed the analysis of her data. In this paper, we theorize three themes that were generated from the data analysis. We assert that in order to prevent RtI from becoming another unsuccessful, de-contextualized, large-scale effort, teachers and students would benefit from a culturally relevant response to intervention—a commitment to locate the contextual contingencies in which RtI is being implemented; to pay attention to what happens in the “down time” outside of the scripted parts of RtI lessons; and to make explicit efforts to use children’s own stories as the RtI texts.

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