Identifier

etd-04072017-151356

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

The consideration of parents’ acceptance of child discipline methods is important when developing culturally sensitive parent training programs, as treatment acceptability has been associated with treatment adherence and effectiveness. Past parent training research has primarily been conducted with middle-income, Caucasian mothers. The purpose of this study is to examine parents’ acceptance of five common discipline methods often used by or recommended to parents. To address the lack of research considering parental factors, this study examines the influence of gender, race, and income on parents’ acceptability ratings. Participants were 106 mothers from heterogeneous backgrounds. Acceptability ratings were measured using the Treatment Evaluation Inventory, Short Form (Kelley, Heffer, Gresham, & Elliott, 1989). Results indicated that parents from different racial and income backgrounds differed in their ratings of treatment acceptability, particularly in terms of medication and corporal punishment. These findings are relatively consistent with past studies, but suggest an increased acceptance of corporal punishment among some parent groups. This study supports the importance of considering parents acceptance of varying discipline methods when recommending and adapting parent-training programs.

Date

2016

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Kelley, Mary Lou

Included in

Psychology Commons

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