Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education Leadership

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

The quantitative study was an ex-post-facto study design to explore specific factors and their magnitude that predicts the successful matriculation toward and achievement of a bachelor’s degree by Black students enrolled at a PWI in the deep South. The researcher pursued to explore the direction and magnitude that fall into the following three categories on several measures the matriculation progress toward and deficit of a bachelor’s degree: student demographics characteristics, socio-economic background and economic status, and pre-and post-admission academic readiness and performance. The study was established on Tinto’s (1993) Model of Institutional Departure. Moreover, the study used binomial logistic regression, which explored the direction and magnitude that fall into the following three categories on several measures the matriculation progress toward and deficit of a bachelor’s degree. There were three research questions associated with the study including: RQ1. What is the relationship between demographic characteristics and college persistence of Black students at a PWI in the deep south? RQ2. How do the pre- and post-college admission academic characteristics correlate college persistence of Black students enrolled in a PWI in the deep south? RQ3. How do the socio-economic characteristics predict Black students' college success in a PWI in the deep south? This research study included 718 participants who were tracked for six years, from 2012 – 2018. The findings confirmed that Black student’s gender, high school GPA, ACT score, college GPA, college major choice, earned credit hours, and parent’s income were all statistically significant in their persistence. The research found that higher persistence rates are consistent with previous literature review.

Date

12-18-2021

Committee Chair

Curry, Jennifer

Available for download on Friday, December 13, 2024

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