Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Curriculum & Instruction

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

For many years technological advancements have influenced the style of classroom instruction in primary, secondary, and higher education classrooms across the United States. Today, many collegiate mathematics classrooms have transitioned from a traditional lecture-based class to an alternate course delivery system using technology and instructional software developed by textbook publishing companies. Although many variations of this implementation exist throughout the nation, Dr. Twigg of the National Center for Academic Transformation was the first to originate the concept of this particular course redesign. According to Twigg, the primary objective of the course redesign was to improve student learning outcomes, while simultaneously reducing the cost of higher education. Although, there is a vast amount of quantitative research confirming this new course delivery system does improve retention rates among developmental math and college algebra students, there is limited research on the beliefs and experience of students involved with this delivery system.

This study sought to investigate the experiences of eight undergraduate students who took college algebra in this specific delivery system. Using a case study design, descriptions of lived experiences in the course redesign were collected through eight student interviews, five classroom observations, and a collection of documents. The researcher interpreted students’ attitudes, values, and beliefs to describe their experiences of a college algebra course using this technological course redesign. Furthermore, self-regulated learning was used to describe the student participants’ learning strategies.

The findings in this study describe six themes: (1) time management; (2) interaction with resources; (3) individual persistence; (4) instructional support; (5) supports for successful learning; and (6) habits of successful learners. Lastly, this study identified student self-regulated learning strategies that were used to learn mathematics within the course delivery system as well as the self-regulated learning strategies initiated by the course redesign format.

Committee Chair

Skinner, Kim

Available for download on Tuesday, May 23, 2028

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