Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Research has documented the relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom severity and poor academic outcomes. However, few studies have focused on identifying moderating variables of academic performance specific to adolescents, especially those with ADHD. The current study seeks to address these limitations, further exploring moderators of academic outcomes in a clinical sample of adolescents with ADHD. Specifically, the present study examined adolescent ratings of routines, parent-adolescent conflict, perceptions of parental involvement, and school engagement, on the relationship between ADHD symptom severity and academic performance (GPA). The sample consisted of a total of 140 caregiver-adolescent dyads ranging from ages 11- to 17-years in a sample of adolescents with ADHD. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that adolescent report of school engagement moderated the relationship between ADHD symptom severity and adolescent GPA. Routines, parent-adolescent conflict, and perceptions of parental involvement were not supported as moderators of the relationship between ADHD symptom severity and academic outcomes.

Date

8-21-2020

Committee Chair

Kelley, Mary Lou

Available for download on Friday, August 20, 2021

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