Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

LSU School of Leadership and Human Resource Development

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

A farmer’s job performance is critical to the production of raw materials such as food, fiber, and fuel and is therefore an important concern for individuals, businesses, and economies across the world. The literature on improving farmers’ job performance has focused more on introducing new technologies, and less on the psychosocial factors that improve job performance. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the impact of psychological empowerment, workplace motivation, and social capital on farmers’ job performance in Honduras.

A mixed methods approach was used to collect and analyze both quantitative and qualitative data. For quantitative data, a paper-and-pencil-based questionnaire with 53 items (excluding nine demographic questions) was distributed. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was adopted to analyze data from 396 responses. For qualitative data, semi-structured individual interviews (six farmers) and a dyadic focus group (three farmers) were conducted. By using the constant comparison method, the qualitative data were coded and analyzed for emergent themes. The combined findings were compared for confirmation, discordance, and for expansion of the data.

The relationship between psychological empowerment and job performance was found to be statistically significant. For the qualitative findings, the farmers described that their experience of control and impact on others influenced their job performance. Machismo was an expansion to quantitative data, where female farmers described that gender relations may influence their job performance. The relationship between workplace motivation and job performance was not found to be statistically significant. The qualitative data displayed discordance, where farmers revealed that money, work conditions, and heritage played a role in their job performance. The relationship between social capital and job performance was found to be statistically significant. For the qualitative findings, the farmers revealed that the power of unity played a role in their job performance. The combined findings also suggest that workplace motivation may mediate the relationship between psychological empowerment and job performance, and social capital and job performance.

The findings are discussed considering the current research on job performance in human resource development. The implications of the study are presented for theory, practice, and policy. Finally, recommendations are made for future studies.

Date

4-11-2020

Committee Chair

Park, Sunyoung

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