Identifier

etd-06202017-121456

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Test anxiety is a construct that includes cognitive, physiological, and behavioral symptoms occurring in response to anxiety prior to, during, or following examinations. The current literature on test anxiety has evaluated a number of possible predictors, including demographic variables, academic indicators, and self-perceptions. The movement toward school accountability and higher academic expectations of students has increased the severity of consequences occurring as a result of poor academic achievement. Thus, test anxiety is a critical concern that may impact student academic success. The current study evaluated a structural equation model to determine the strength of associations between trait anxiety, academic achievement, academic self-efficacy, and parental pressure, as well as how each of these variables predicted test anxiety among college undergraduates. The results indicated that trait anxiety and academic achievement predicted academic self-efficacy, and trait anxiety and academic self-efficacy predicted test anxiety. Factors that may have influenced the need for modifications to the structural model will be discussed, including psychometric concerns and theoretical implications.

Date

2016

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Noell, George

Included in

Psychology Commons

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