Identifier

etd-07062017-165418

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This study explored the tenure experiences of seven Black female professors as they pursued tenure at select public higher/highest research activity predominantly white institutions. This study was pursued in an attempt to determine what challenges were presented during the tenure process. More importantly, this study sought to determine the role of mentorship in the pursuit of tenure. In addition, recommendations for success were offered to Black females who are currently pursuing tenure or who may choose to enter the academy. A narrative research study was utilized for this study which was informed by Black Feminist Thought. This allowed for a look into the experiences of Black female faculty at PWIs. Interviews were conducted with seven tenured Black female professors in spring 2017 at public, higher/highest research activity predominantly white institutions in the Midwestern and Southern states of the U.S. Interviews included 5 associate professors and 2 full professors. Participants talked about their experiences during open-ended semi-structured interviews. Evidence is presented on how the tenure and promotion process was viewed by each participant. The three research questions addressed in the study are: (1) What are the experiences of Black female professors at select public higher/highest research activity predominantly white institutions as they pursued tenure? (2) What recommendations would they offer to other Black female professors at public higher/highest research activity predominantly white institutions pursuing a career in academia? (3) What role has mentorship played in their experiences in academia?

Date

2017

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Mitchell, Roland

Included in

Education Commons

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