Title

Sea-level-induced seismicity and submarine landslide occurrence

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2013

Abstract

The temporal coincidence between rapid late Pleistocene sealevel rise and large-scale slope failures is widely documented. Nevertheless, the physical mechanisms that link these phenomena are poorly understood, particularly along nonglaciated margins. Here we investigate the causal relationships between rapid sea-level rise, flexural stress loading, and increased seismicity rates along passive margins. We find that Coulomb failure stress across fault systems of passive continental margins may have increased more than 1 MPa during rapid late Pleistocene-early Holocene sea-level rise, an amount sufficient to trigger fault reactivation and rupture. These results suggest that sea-level-modulated seismicity may have contributed to a number of poorly understood but widely observed phenomena, including (1) increased frequency of large-scale submarine landslides during rapid, late Pleistocene sea-level rise; (2) emplacement of coarse-grained mass transport deposits on deep-sea fans during the early stages of marine transgression; and (3) the unroofing and release of methane gas sequestered in continental slope sediments. © 2013 Geological Society of America.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Geology

First Page

979

Last Page

982

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