Title

Palynological reconstruction of environmental changes in coastal wetlands of the Florida Everglades since the mid-Holocene

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2015

Abstract

© 2015 University of Washington. Palynological, loss-on-ignition, and X-ray fluorescence data from a 5.25. m sediment core from a mangrove forest at the mouth of the Shark River Estuary in the southwestern Everglades National Park, Florida were used to reconstruct changes occurring in coastal wetlands since the mid-Holocene. This multi-proxy record contains the longest paleoecological history to date in the southwestern Everglades. The Shark River Estuary basin was formed ~. 5700. cal. yr BP in response to increasing precipitation. Initial wetlands were frequently-burned short-hydroperiod prairies, which transitioned into long-hydroperiod prairies with sloughs in which peat deposits began to accumulate continuously about 5250. cal. yr BP. Our data suggest that mangrove communities started to appear after ~. 3800. cal. yr BP; declines in the abundance of charcoal suggested gradual replacement of fire-dominated wetlands by mangrove forest over the following 2650. yr. By. ~. 1150. cal. yr BP, a dense Rhizophora mangle dominated mangrove forest had formed at the mouth of the Shark River. The mangrove-dominated coastal ecosystem here was established at least 2000. yr later than has been previously estimated.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Quaternary Research (United States)

First Page

449

Last Page

458

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS