Title

Effect of microbial phytase addition with or without the trace mineral premix in nursery, growing, and finishing pig diets

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2005

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine the interactive effects of phytase with and without a trace mineral premix (TMP) in diets for nursery, growing, and finishing pigs on growth performance, bone responses, and tissue mineral concentrations. Pigs (initial and final BW of 5.5 and 111.6 kg [Exp. 1] or 5.4 and 22.6 kg [Exp. 2]) were allotted to treatments on the basis of BW with eight (Exp. 1) or six (Exp. 2) replications of six or seven pigs per replicate pen. Pigs were started on the diets the day of weaning (average of 18 d). In both experiments, the treatments were with or without 500 phytase units/kg of diet and with or without the TMP in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. The Ca and available P concentrations were decreased by 0.10% in diets with phytase. The nursery phase consisted of Phase I (7 d), Phase II (14 d), and Phase III (13 d) periods. In Exp. 1, 26 of 52 pigs fed the diet without the TMP and without phytase had severe skin lesions and decreased growth performance; therefore, pigs fed this diet were switched to the positive control diet. In Exp. 2, the treatment without the TMP and without phytase had 12 replications instead of six. At the end of Phase III, half these replications were switched to the positive control diet and half were switched to the diet without the TMP but with phytase. In Exp. 1 during Phases II and III and in the overall data, pigs fed the diet without the TMP had decreased ADG and ADFI, but the addition of phytase prevented these responses (phytase x TMP; P < 0.02). Growth performance was not affected by diet during the growing-finishing period. Coccygeal bone Zn and Na concentrations were decreased (P < 0.09) in pigs fed the diet without the TMP, and adding phytase increased (P < 0.03) Zn and Fe concentrations. In Exp. 2 during Phases I and II, pigs fed the diet without the TMP had decreased ADG, but the addition of phytase prevented this response (phytase x TMP; P < 0.10). Pigs fed the diet without the TMP had decreased (P < 0.10) ADG (Phase II and overall), ADFI (Phases II and III and in the overall data), and G:F (Phase III). Coccygeal bone Zn and Cu concentrations were decreased (P < 0.09) in pigs fed the diet without the TMP, and adding phytase increased (P < 0.03) Zn concentration in the bones. These data indicate that removing the TMP in diets for nursery pigs decreases growth performance and bone mineral content, and that phytase addition to the diet without the TMP prevented the decreased growth performance. ©2005 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Journal of Animal Science

First Page

376

Last Page

385

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