Title

Evaluation of Duddingtonia flagrans in reducing infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus in feces of sheep

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-28-2002

Abstract

Consequences of nematode infections due to Haemonchus contortus are a serious constraint for the sheep industry worldwide. Development of anthelmintic resistance and increasing concern about the impact of anthelmintic use dictate the need of alternative control. Such an alternative is using the nematode trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans to reduce infective larvae levels on pasture. Two trials were conducted to determine the effect of D. flagrans in reducing infective larvae (predominantly H. contortus) in feces. The first trial determined the dose effect of D. flagrans in reducing infective larvae in feces. Eighteen ewes were dewormed to remove existing infections and randomly assigned to six treatment groups: 5 × 104, 1 × 105, 2.5 × 105, 5 × 105, 1 × 106 or no (control) spores of D. flagrans per kg of body weight mixed in their feed for 7 days. Fecal samples were collected daily from these and from infected donor ewes. Feces from individual-treated ewes were mixed with equal amounts of donor ewe feces, theoretically approximating oral dose spore concentrations of 2.5 × 104, 5 × 104, 1.25 × 105, 2.5 × 105, 5 × 105 and no spores, and were cultured. Across dosages and during the 7 days of fungus feeding, percent reduction of infective larvae ranged from 76.6 to 100.0%. The second trial determined the effect of D. flagrans at the dose of 105 spores per kg body weight on reducing infective larvae in feces from naturally infected lambs. Twenty lambs were randomly assigned to either treatment or control groups based on fecal egg count. Treatment lambs were fed spores mixed in feed for 7 days. Feces were collected daily and cultured. During the 7 days of fungus feeding, the percent reduction of infective larvae ranged from 82.8 to 99.7%. Results of these trials demonstrated that the nematode trapping fungus D. flagrans was highly effective in reducing infective larvae in sheep feces and should be considered as a biological control agent for integrated nematode control programs. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Publication Source (Journal or Book title)

Veterinary Parasitology

First Page

259

Last Page

265

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