Identifier

etd-06282013-193921

Degree

Master of Natural Sciences (MNS)

Department

Natural Sciences (Interdepartmental Program)

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

This research explores the effects of frequent quizzing versus no quizzing in a high school Physical Science class. The study population included two freshman level Physical Science Honors classes. The content in this study included Classifying Matter, States of Matter, Atomic Bonding, Motion and Forces and Motion. For each chapter covered one class served as a control group, getting no quizzes, and the other class served as an experimental group, getting frequent quizzes. Prior to being taught information on the 5 chapters covered in this study, a 15-question pre-test was administered to the students. The information was delivered in the same manner, by lecture and PowerPoints, to both the control and the experimental groups. Upon completion of each section of the chapter, the experimental group took a 10-question quiz. The control group was allowed to review their notes. A post-test was given after covering all of the material for each chapter. The pre-tests and post-tests were generated using software and a question database for choosing questions based on state standards and learning objectives. Raw gains of the study population from pre-test to post-test were analyzed and compared to determine if the quizzes had increased student knowledge for the chapter. No statistical significance was found between the non-quizzed and the quizzed groups.

Date

2013

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Moroney, James

Share

COinS