Identifier

etd-04012008-180807

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

This study explored the moderating effects of disaster exposure on the relationships between youth conduct problems and a variety of risk and protective factors in a low-income population. Specifically, the study tests the moderating roles of hurricane-related life-threatening events and loss/disruption on the relations between conduct problems and violence exposure, social support, parenting behaviors, and family routines, respectively. This study draws data from an existing dataset, comprised of 281 displaced mother-child dyads from New Orleans and 98 non-displaced mother-child dyads from Baton Rouge, a city approximately 85 miles west of New Orleans. It was predicted that heightened conduct problems would be associated with more prior violence exposure, less perceived social support, and parenting behaviors including more corporal punishment and inconsistent discipline, as well as fewer family routines. It was further predicted that level of hurricane exposure would moderate each of these relations. Results indicate that the level of hurricane exposure moderated the relation between conduct problems and violence exposure, as well as that between conduct problems and family routines. Implications are discussed.

Date

2008

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Mary Lou Kelley

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS