Identifier

etd-04122007-183353

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Self-managed interventions can be especially beneficial during the adolescent years, as expectations of a child’s academic independence increase. Self-monitoring, a type of self-managed intervention, has been used to assess problem behaviors, evaluate treatment effectiveness, promote behavior change, and increase homework production. Goal-setting, another form of self-management has been associated with improvements in behavior, academics, and homework. However, no known studies have compared the effectiveness of self-monitoring and goal-setting homework interventions in ADHD adolescents. The current study compares two self-managed interventions, goal-setting and self-monitoring, in an attempt to determine their effectiveness with ADHD adolescents with problematic homework behavior. Participants were trained in establishing a structured homework routine and taught one of two student-managed homework interventions in which they either monitored their homework routine and homework completion or monitored their homework-specific goal achievement. Homework problems, as defined by the Homework Problem Checklist (HPC), and teacher-reported homework grades were monitored. No significant treatment effects were observed. Finding implications are discussed.

Date

2007

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Mary L. Kelley

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS