Identifier

etd-1113102-223702

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Geography and Anthropology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

The Ocmulgee Big Bend and Lake Blackshear regions of Georgia have diverse uplands and lowlands, rich in different types of food. Archaeological investigations have shown Late Woodland-style ceramics and artifacts extending up to the Middle Mississippian Period in these regions. Archaeologists have proposed the people of this region did not adopt maize agriculture or a Mississippian subsistence or cultural pattern during the Early Mississippian Period. This study tests this hypothesis with osteological and isotopic data from burials recovered from the Cannon site (9Cp52) and osteological data from the Telfair Mound site (9Tf2). Isotopic data demonstrate clearly that these people were not consuming maize, but were consuming some food high in carbohydrates. Potential sources of carbohydrates are discussed, as are possible models to explain the dental and isotopic data, including one based upon starchy seed agriculture. Finally, future lines of research, stemming from questions in this research, are outlined.

Date

2002

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Rebecca Saunders

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