Identifier

etd-07022007-165132

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Art

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

For the majority of people, video art does not have a major impact on their daily lives. Between ubiquitous television monitors and incessant internet pop-ups, attention paid to a video in an art gallery is passing at best. How can one's video creations make an impression on such an already visually-immersed culture? Video artist Omer Fast, uses editorial effects such as dubbing, mistranslations, and splicing in his documentary-style works to attract the attention of, and later alienate, his audience. This essay analyzes Fast's oeuvre and deconstructs the ways in which he attracts audience interest and subsequently encourages his audiences, through alienation, to become more critical viewers for both his artwork and their daily lives. The application of critical theory, such as Bertolt Brecht's Verfremdungseffekt and Jean Baudrillard's concept of simulacra, add to Fast's editorial effects in order to set him apart from the standard contemporary video artist. Notably, Fast addresses aspects of artist ethics in his work, which ultimately distinguishes him as a unique leader in contemporary art.

Date

2007

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Susan Elizabeth Ryan

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