Identifier

etd-0419102-100900

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Much existing research on migration of Mexican women has focused on those who migrate to the United States. However, most Mexican female migrants move within the country. This study asks two interrelated questions: (1) Does education, marital status, and the number of children influence Mexican women's migration status and (2) are there any differences in the way these factors affect internal versus international migration. Data from the Mexican Migration Project (2001) collected during the winter months of 1987-1997 (N=7610) are employed and three models are constructed, where non-migrants serve as the reference category. These models are also used to examine differential effects of these determinants for internal and international migrants. I find that higher educational attainment consistently increases the likelihood of internal migration. Among migrants, having some college education is a strong predictor of internal migration. In addition, being single increases the likelihood of being a migrant. I also find that larger family size decreases the odds of being an international migrant, but it has no such effect on internal migration. I conclude that beneficial returns to increasing educational attainment for women encourage their migration within Mexico, regardless of the number of children. Moreover, the temporary nature of international migration and the pattern of migrating prior to marriage (thus, usually prior to having children) contribute to the different effects of education and number of children on internal and international.

Date

2002

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Joachim Singelmann

Included in

Sociology Commons

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