Identifier

etd-07142006-104355

Degree

Master of Music (MM)

Department

Music

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Various approaches have been used over the past 50 years to describe and analyze works that exhibit tonality but have more than one tonic. This paper focuses solely on a subcategory of such works: those that begin in one key and end in another, the first key being permanently replaced by the second. The most prominent systems of terminology and analysis for such works include “progressive tonality,” “directional tonality,” “interlocking structures,” and “background conglomerates.” After examining these systems, “background conglomerates” is determined to best suit works that permanently change tonics. This approach, which was introduced by Harald Krebs, employs a Schenkerian based style of analysis to show that two Ursätze are present in the background of these works. Applying Krebs’s style of analysis reveals that many different structures can occur in background conglomerates, one of which has never been identified: elided Ursätze. The possibilities for elided Ursätze are explored and Alkan’s Quasi-Faust, the second movement of his Grande Sonate op. 33, is provided as an example. The effects that the elided Ursätze has on the sonata form and octave line of Quasi-Faust are also addressed.

Date

2006

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Samuel Ng

Included in

Music Commons

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