Identifier

etd-11152007-171346

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Self-Monitoring of Attention (SMA) is a behavioral technique in which an individual assesses whether or not a target behavior (e.g. off-task behavior) has occurred and then records the result. In this study, two components were manipulated in a SMA procedure: the use of a tactile prompt and the schedule at which prompts are delivered. While SMA is a well-established intervention for increasing on-task behavior and decreasing problem behavior, standardizing the procedures has received little to no research. The current study examined the length of the cueing interval and compared different percentages of an individual's inter response time (IRT) (50% IRT, 100% IRT, and 200% IRT) during a SMA procedure with typically developing children using a tactile cueing prompt (via MotivAider™). This study showed that basing the cueing interval on IRT alone in a SMA procedure was not effective in decreasing levels of off-task behavior; however, contingent rewards (CR) alone (M = 9.9%), as well as CR with IRT cueing (M = 8.6%) had a significant effect in reducing off-task behavior from a mean baseline percentage of intervals of 42.5% for all three participants.

Date

2007

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

George Noell

Included in

Psychology Commons

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