Identifier

etd-01112013-164000

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Crime and violence are common in impoverished neighborhoods. Consequently, many youth are at risk for victimization and witnessing violent acts. Extensive research has established the presence of significant associations between violence exposure and aggression and posttraumatic stress symptoms among youth. Research has confirmed the protective role of several family characteristics against these negative outcomes despite adversity. However, the literature investigating the buffering effects of family in the relationship between community violence exposure and aggressive behavior and posttraumatic stress symptoms is limited. The current study examined the moderating effect of family factors such as household structure, social support, and parenting techniques in the relationship between substantial community violence exposure and two highly associated negative outcomes (aggression and PTS symptoms). Hierarchical multiple regressions revealed that, above and beyond other family qualities, parenting techniques such as involvement and praise acted as significant protective factors in the relationship between community violence exposure and subsequent aggression among impoverished youth. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

Date

2013

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Kelley, Mary Lou

Included in

Psychology Commons

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