Identifier

etd-07082010-111610

Degree

Master of Natural Sciences (MNS)

Department

Natural Sciences (Interdepartmental Program)

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

High school physics tests and web-based homework grades were analyzed to determine if web-based homework improves test grades; if the number of web assignments before a test affects the test grade; and if the length of the web assignment affects the number of students that complete the homework assignment. The test grades of students who did their homework were compared to test grades of students who did not do their homework; the assumption was that doing web-based homework improved test grades at this school during the four years studied. The homework group scored seven points higher on average than the group that did not do homework. A two-tailed t-Test verified this difference. Analysis II involved students’ test grades arranged into four categories which corresponded to the number of web homework assignments per test: 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1. Mean test scores were analyzed. It was found that having three or four homework assignments before a test produced much higher test grades, whereas one or two assignments produced no significant increase. ANOVA confirmed the statistical significance among the four groups. Analysis III compared the length of the assignment to the number of students who did not do the assignment. Results showed that a greater number of students failed to complete the shorter assignments.

Date

2010

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Watkins, Steve

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