Identifier

etd-11162006-134428

Degree

Master of Mass Communication (MMC)

Department

Mass Communication

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

As the numbers rise among African Americans who are contracting HIV/AIDS, it becomes evident that research is needed to examine where African Americans obtain HIV/AIDS information. This study identified where African Americans obtain HIV/AIDS information and examined how that information affects African Americans’ sexual beliefs about HIV/AIDS. The theoretical foundation for this study was the Health Belief Model (HBM). This study used a survey method. The data analysis demonstrated that race does influence the type of media an individual uses. Race does not impact an individual’s access to health information. Knowledge about HIV/AIDS impacts an individual’s sexual beliefs about HIV/AIDS. Cues from the media and physicians impact an individual’s sexual beliefs about HIV/AIDS. Perceived susceptibility impacts an individual’s sexual beliefs about HIV/AIDS. The frequency of any media does not always lead to knowledge about HIV/AIDS. African Americans are more likely to use television to obtain HIV/AIDS information than other races (r = .161, p < 0.01). In addition, African Americans are more likely to use radio to obtain HIV/AIDS information than other races (r = .193, p < 0.01). Thus, African Americans media use of radio and television increased their knowledge about HIV/AIDS.

Date

2006

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Denis Wu

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