Identifier

etd-04132004-185813

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Geography and Anthropology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

This thesis addresses how the notions of ethnicity and heritage are experienced, negotiated, and displayed by two Hispanic groups in Louisiana. Hispanic identity is a nebulous term anywhere and Louisiana is no exception. In this investigation the two groups- a heritage foundation of descendants of Canary Islanders and descendants of the of the Los Adaes communities- both profess Hispanic heritage, display it, and promote this heritage in divergent ways, with significant differences in the meaning of their heritages. Differences between groups are also reflected in the historical spatial representations of the two groups, with Isleños connecting with a far-away but set of islands which they visit, and the Los Adaes peoples connecting with a long gone Spanish mission and fort that can only be reached through historical recreation and storytelling. Conceptions of ethnicity can remain powerful even while the common understanding of the meaning of “Spanish” is vaguely conceived. These two groups expressing an historic Louisiana Spanish heritage are, in fact, exceedingly dissimilar.

Date

2004

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Miles Richardson

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