Identifier

etd-03272013-165129

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Disruptive classroom behaviors are among the most prevalent of childhood problems and are associated with reduced instruction time, poor academic achievement, and persistent behavior problems throughout childhood. Class-wide interventions, such as the Mystery Motivator, are an easy and time efficient way to increase the level of classroom management and remediate disruptive behavior patterns. Although the effectiveness of class-wide interventions is well documented, the literature is still inconsistent as to which type of reinforcement is more effective when using behavioral interventions. Some research suggests individuals prefer a choice in reinforcement, while other research suggests choice is just as preferred as reinforcement without a choice. A multiple baseline design across three elementary school classrooms was used to demonstrate the effects of the Mystery Motivator intervention on disruptive behaviors. Additionally, this study compared the differential effects of using an unknown reinforcer (no choice, or mystery, reinforcement) and a chosen reinforcer. Results showed that the Mystery Motivator intervention was effective in decreasing disruptive behaviors, and this effect was equally effective when using an unknown or a chosen reinforcer.

Date

2013

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Gresham, Frank M.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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