Identifier

etd-05082006-144610

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

The scope of government spending has gained significant attention in comparative politics. Disaggregate level data has allowed researchers to examine the impact of electoral rules and party fragmentation on the nature of government spending. Findings supported by large-N empirical tests suggest that fragmented polities are more likely to observe a shift in government expenditures: away from expenditures on public goods and in the direction of transfers and subsidies. In this paper, I test the applicability of these findings to Latin America. Using empirical evidence based on 13 Latin American countries over a 17 year period, the findings of this paper suggest that the number of parties does not impact government spending in Latin America, mainly due to an ideological vacuum that is characteristic of most countries in the region.

Date

2006

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

William Clark

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