Identifier

etd-03252005-165703

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use patterns and beliefs, the Gambling Task, the delay discounting task, and the Adult Self-Report (ASR). Sixty-eight college students completed measures of substance use, social desirability, the MDMA Beliefs Questionnaire (MDMA-BQ), the Gambling Task, the delay discounting task, and the ASR. Contrary to predictions, participants who had used MDMA at least once did not vary from those who had never used MDMA on the Gambling Task, the delay discounting task, or the ASR. As predicted, MDMA users’ outcome expectancies for MDMA significantly differed from non-users. MDMA-BQ scales and age of first MDMA use were not correlated with Gambling Task, delay discounting task, or ASR scores. No relationships were found among Gambling Task, delay discounting task, and ASR scores.

Date

2005

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Amy L. Copeland

Included in

Psychology Commons

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