Identifier

etd-03162008-175714

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Thesis

Abstract

Brief interventions for college student drinkers have been shown to be effective in reducing the amount of alcohol consumed as well as the number of alcohol-related problems. However, the duration of brief interventions varies substantially across studies. In the present study 22 undergraduate students who drank alcohol heavily were randomly assigned to a 10-minute brief intervention, a 50-minute brief intervention, or a six week wait-list control group. The content of the active interventions was based on the same concept, and both interventions incorporated motivational interviewing components. As hypothesized, there was a significant difference between participants in the two active interventions regarding their alcohol consumption at a 4-week post-intervention follow up. However, albeit not significantly, participants in the 50-minute condition increased their drinking while participants in the 10-minute condition decreased their drinking. Contrary to prediction, no significant differences were found between the two treatment groups treatment groups in the number of alcohol related problems at 4 weeks post-intervention. These findings may be due to insufficient power to detect differences because of the small sample size.

Date

2008

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Copeland Amy L.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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