Date of Award

2000

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Katie E. Cherry

Abstract

The influence of age, ability, monitoring, and metamemory on event-based prospective memory was examined using an adapted version of G. O. Einstein and M. A. McDaniel's (1990) task. Two samples of younger and older adults who differed in educational attainment and verbal ability were compared. Contrary to previous research (Cherry & LeCompte, 1999), the age/ability groups did not differ on prospective memory performance. On-line monitoring ratings were not related to prospective memory but posttest monitoring ratings were. Age differences in reports of task-irrelevant thoughts emerged from the on-line monitoring data. Although age and ability group differences on self-reports of memory functioning and memory knowledge were evident, neither memory functioning nor memory knowledge were strongly related to prospective memory performance. Recognition memory performance was the strongest predictor of successful prospective memory, followed by working memory. In contrast, age, ability, working memory, and recognition were all predictors of retrospective memory, with age, ability, and working memory making stronger contributions to retrospective than to prospective memory. These findings and their implications for current conceptions of prospective memory aging are discussed.

ISBN

9780493071541

Pages

106

Share

COinS