Date of Award

2000

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Communication Studies

First Advisor

Kenneth Zagacki

Abstract

The Morrill Act was the political telos of numerous rhetorical messages calling for pedagogical changes in higher education. This study examines the role of prudence in four of them. The method is a mode of textual criticism that attempts to capture the bifurcated sense of rhetorical invention: The immediate rhetorical situation, and the cultural grammar that constrains the rhetor performatively. The author illustrates how the relevant rhetorical strategies/gestures within each text and the text's textual context pointed to a certain conception of prudence. Historically, the author argues that the struggles between different notions of prudence impacted political, pedagogical action. Theoretically, the author reflects on the nature of prudence in relation to the rhetorical canons, agent, purpose, and audience. The study contributes to a broader understanding of how prudence emerges in rhetorical action.

ISBN

9780599853386

Pages

232

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