Date of Award

1999

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Earl H. Cheek, Jr

Abstract

The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe and analyze the technology components in three teacher education programs, and to investigate the technological preparedness of recently graduated first-year elementary (K--5) teachers. The research questions addressed were: (a) How are the teacher education programs at each university in this study preparing students to integrate technology into their classrooms and instruction, and how do the programs compare? (b) How do recently graduated first-year teachers at each university rate their skills in using technology, and how do their ratings compare? (c) How and to what extent do recently graduated first-year teachers at each university use technology in their classrooms, and how do their responses compare? (d) How do recently graduated first-year teachers evaluate their preservice preparation for integrating technology into their classrooms, and how do their evaluations compare? Qualitative case studies conducted at Georgia State University, Southeastern Louisiana University, and the University of North Texas provided detailed information about how each university's teacher education program was preparing students to integrate technology into their own classrooms. Additionally, the results of a survey completed by 87 first-year elementary (K--5) teachers who were recent graduates of the universities provided quantitative and qualitative data to triangulate the findings of the case studies. Data from the 98-item questionnaire included information on the teachers' personal and professional background, self-rated skills for using technology, classroom use of technology, and evaluation of their preservice preparation to use technology. Five major components related to the use of technology within the teacher education programs emerged during the course of this study. These components included program design, expectations, facilities, support, and use of technology. Each component, as well as the perceptions of the recent graduates, provided a mechanism for making comparisons between and among the three participating universities. Based on the comparative analysis, several recommendations for revising and improving the way that teacher education programs prepare new teachers to use technology are suggested.

ISBN

9780599636064

Pages

219

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