Date of Award

1999

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

First Advisor

Eric P. Braverman

Abstract

Today's organizations face increased global and domestic competition, more downsizing, growing emphasis on team based work, and increased focus on customer service issues. This changing work environment necessitates a more complete examination of contextual factors impacting service delivery, including extra-role employee job behaviors (Bettencourt & Brown, 1997; Borman & Motowidlo, 1997). The current study examines the effects of employees' extra-role job behaviors on customers' perceptions of service. Specifically, the present study investigates two types of employee extra-role job behaviors: (1) organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), and (2) organizationally deviant behaviors (ODBs). These specific employee extra-role job behaviors are studied in order to determine their potential relationship with specific dimensions of customers' perceptions of the service they receive. In general, it was postulated that OCBs are positively related and ODBs negatively related to customers' perceptions of service they receive. More specifically, interpersonal OCBs are more strongly related to customers' perceptions of service than noninterpersonal OCBs. These suppositions were supported. On the other hand, noninterpersonal, more serious ODBs are postulated to be more strongly related to customers' perceptions of service than are interpersonal, less serious ODBs. Only ODBs more serious in nature proved to be more strongly related to customers' perceptions of service in the current investigation. The present study has implications for future research regarding employee extra-role job behaviors. Specifically, present results indicate that employee extra-role job behaviors are significantly related to and account for variance in customers' perceptions of the service they receive. In addition, examining these types of employee behaviors at the group level proved to be effective. This type of group analysis had not been conducted in previous related research. Future studies should further examine the relationships identified in the current investigation in other settings.

ISBN

9780599635913

Pages

120

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