Date of Award

1998

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Management (Business Administration)

First Advisor

Nathan Bennett

Abstract

Current conceptualizations of procedural justice focus largely on individual perceptions; no framework exists for examining procedural justice's social context. This dissertation presents a model that identifies contextual factors contributing to procedural justice climate and, in turn, a variety of work-related attitudes and behaviors associated with procedural justice climate. In general, empirical tests on data collected from 220 employees of two banks offered support for the model. Employee perceptions of leader member exchange, organizational support, and supervisor monitoring were positively associated with individual procedural justice perceptions. Work group perceptions of cohesion and supervisor visibility in demonstrating procedural justice were associated with the development of procedural justice climate. Work group demographic similarity and shared support perceptions were not associated with the development of procedural justice climate. A contextual effect was found for organizational citizenship behaviors. Specifically, procedural justice climate explained variance in organizational citizenship behaviors beyond the effects of individual procedural justice perceptions. Contextual effects were not found for organizational commitment and turnover intentions. Implications of the model for theory, research, and practice are presented.

ISBN

9780591904819

Pages

121

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