Date of Award

1996

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership, Research and Counseling

First Advisor

S. Kim MacGregor

Abstract

This ethnographic study provides a description and analysis of the use of videoconferencing to teach an eight-week parenting class to parents enrolled in two family literacy programs. It describes the sites, details interactions that take place during videoconferencing, and investigates parents affective response to the technology. Data were collected through participant observation, interviews, video-recordings, and questionnaires. Results indicated cross-site differences in the existing program, in affective responses of users, and in interactions during the technology-mediated classes. Findings showed that the parenting classes were successful. Factors that influence effectiveness of videoconferencing instruction are discussed. Results indicated that technological factors such as quality of transmission, organizational factors such as frequency of exposure, and contextual factors such as receptivity affected videoconferencing. Instructional methods and techniques that work well in videoconferencing and the teachers' suggestions for future uses of videoconferencing are presented. A frame-work for interaction analysis examining direct and indirect effects of the mediating technology on interaction is presented.

ISBN

9780591288940

Pages

216

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