Date of Award

1994

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA)

Department

Music

First Advisor

Kathleen Rountree

Abstract

Maurice Hinson is internationally recognized as one of the foremost authorities on piano literature. He has presented lecture-recitals, workshops, and masterclasses throughout the United States and in many foreign countries, including England, Japan, and Australia. Hinson has written five books that catalogue and annotate the repertoire for piano, including Guide to the Pianist's Repertoire (1973, rev. 1987), The Piano in Chamber Ensemble (1978), Music for Piano and Orchestra (1981), Music for More Than One Piano (1983), and Transcriptions, Paraphrases, and Arrangements (1990), all published by the Indiana University Press. In addition, Hinson has written two piano music reference guides; many articles for music journals; a chapter entitled "Pedaling the Piano Works of Chopin," for Joseph Banowetz's book, The Pianist's Guide to Pedaling (1985, Indiana University Press); and he is co-author with Wiley M. Hitchcock of the article "Piano Music" in The New Grove Dictionary of American Music, (1986, Macmillan Press, Ltd.). Hinson's pedagogical editions of piano music for Alfred, Hinshaw, Belwin Mills, and other publishing companies are among the most useful and reliable editions of their kind available today, particularly in the area of intermediate-level piano literature. They have been prepared from manuscripts or first editions and contain much helpful textual information on the composers and musical styles. Besides their pedagogical aspects, Hinson's editions offer a broad selection of piano literature, including the early compositions of major composers, music of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America, music of female composers, and music of the twentieth century. This study examines Hinson's pedagogical collections for intermediate-level piano students. Chapter 1 discusses Hinson's musical background, highlighting important experiences that helped to shape his career as a pianist, teacher, and music editor. A brief historical overview of pedagogical collections is given in Chapter 2, followed by a summary of Hinson's editorial output in Chapter 3. A comparison of representative scores is included in Chapter 4, and Hinson's Chopin collections are discussed in Chapter 5.

Pages

132

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