Date of Award

1994

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

First Advisor

Keith R. Cadwallader

Abstract

Blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat and its processing by-product (CPB) were characterized by instrumental, olfactometric, and sensory techniques to determine the usefulness of CPB as a feed stock for flavor recovery. Instrumental analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (GC/FTIR) allowed for the identification of 77 and 80 compounds in claw meat and CPB, respectively. Fifty-five compounds were found common to both samples, suggesting that CPB could be a good source for flavor recovery. Quantitatively, trimethylamine (TMA), alkanes (C15-C17, C19), and indole were high ($>$50ng/g) in claw meat while TMA, carbon disulfide, dimethyltrisulfide, alkanes (C15 and C17), geranylacetone, and 1-dodecanol, among other detected compounds, were high in CPB. A subsequent experiment to define claw meat aroma was carried out by analyzing extracts prepared by atmospheric (A-SDE) and vacuum simultaneous steam distillation-solvent extraction (V-SDE) using gas chromatography/olfactometry (GC/O). After data reduction process, the randomly occurring odorants among the replicated samples were eliminated. Claw meat aroma was defined by seven common odorants, of which five were identified as: 2,3-butanedione, pyrrolidine, (Z)-4-heptenal, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, and 3-(methylthio)-propanal. A later experiment involving sensory evaluation confirmed that the aroma of claw meat differed from that of lump meat. The results were in agreement with GC/O findings. Overall results indicated that three odorants were indispensable in crabmeat aroma and could serve as markers for evaluating CPB flavor quality. These markers included pyrrolidine, 2-acetyl-1-pyrrolidine, and 3-(methylthio)-propanal, By monitoring the occurrence and the amount of these markers, it was confirmed that CPB was a good source of flavor recovery. Optimal recovery of these markers could be achieved by heating. Distillation was found to be superior to reflux in recovering the markers.

Pages

130

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