Date of Award

1992

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dirk D. Steiner

Abstract

The present study examined the relationships of politics in appraisal and political use of appraisal to ratee attitudes and desire to respond to appraisal feedback. Hypotheses were developed from research on politics in appraisal, the feedback process model of Ilgen, Fisher, and Taylor, 1979, and equity theory (Adams, 1965). Negative relationships between politics and dependent variables were predicted. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 used 97 professionals in two organizations to test the effects of hypothetical political use of appraisal on their attitudes and desire to respond to appraisal feedback. Study 2 used 98 professionals in an insurance company to investigate the relationship of politics in performance appraisal to ratee attitudes and desire to respond to appraisal feedback. Results of both studies generally supported the hypothesized negative relationship between political distortion of ratings and ratee attitudes and desire to respond to feedback. A tentative model of the effects of politics in performance appraisal was presented and implications of the study for researchers and practitioners were presented and directions for future research were discussed.

Pages

183

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