Date of Award

1991

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

First Advisor

Dean David England

Abstract

The quality of mathematics education has become a major concern to mathematics educators. As a result, increased attention is being given to identifying the abilities that underlie competent performance. An outcome of this effort is an increasing belief that the development of metacognitive skills is an essential component of proficient mathematics performance. Writing, because it promotes reflective thinking, is believed to be the vehicle for this development. Writing in the mathematics classroom has previously received anecdotal support for its benefits to the learner and to the instructor, and limited quantitative benefits in problem-solving ability toward mathematics. This study examined the effect of expressive writing on self-awareness and would suggest quantitative support that writing is beneficial in promoting student ability to assess the correctness of work. If metacognitive skills are a necessary condition for successful mathematics performance, the use of writing may provide the process for attaining these essential skills. Further research in the benefits of writing is warranted by this study.

Pages

150

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