Date of Award

1990

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Mary Lou Kelley

Abstract

This study explored the construct of self-efficacy and provided information about its relationships with intelligence, academic achievement, social skills, and family variables. Specifically, a correlational analysis examined the associations with academic and social self-efficacy, intelligence, academic achievement, and social skills. Exploratory univariate analyses investigated whether self-efficacy beliefs differed for students with varying family structures. Multiple regression analyses were utilized to determine significant predictors of self-efficacy. The results of the analyses indicated that academic self-efficacy was significantly correlated with intelligence, three areas of academic achievement, and social skills. Social self-efficacy was significantly correlated with social skills and two areas of academic achievement. No differences in self-efficacy beliefs for students with varying family structures were found. Additionally, the multiple regression analyses provided evidence that intellectual ability, academic achievement, social skills, and family income could significantly predict academic self-efficacy, and that social skills and mathematics achievement were the best predictors of academic self-efficacy. The combined variables also significantly predicted social self-efficacy, and social skills and written language achievement were the best predictors of social self-efficacy. Both regression analyses accounted for a sizeable amount of variance and reached significance.

Pages

88

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