Date of Award

1988

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Mary Lou Kelley

Abstract

Recently, the influence of setting events upon parent-child interactions has emerged as a focus of study. While the effects of these setting events on family relationships have been discussed, few researchers have attempted to evaluate systematically the influence of a variety of setting events on parent-child interactions. The purpose of this study was to examine a number of potential setting events, and to determine whether these setting events covary with day to day parent-child interactions. Subjects were 7 mother-child dyads seeking psychological services due to the child's oppositional behavior. This study investigated the relationship between setting events (as measured by the Mothers' Activity Checklist and the Community Interaction Checklist), and direct observation of parent-child interactions. The results supported the hypothesis that setting events as measured by the MAC and CIC serve as predictors of aversive mother and child behavior. Research and clinical implications were discussed.

Pages

82

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