Date of Award

1981

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Abstract

The problem investigated in this study involved a comparison of the self-evaluation of teaching skills as perceived by student teachers and the evaluation of these skills by their corresponding supervising teachers. The specific questions to be answered were: (1)Can student teachers effectively predict and assess their teaching strengths and weaknesses? (2)Does an instructional sequence combined with the self-evaluation of videotaped teaching performance aid in improving student teacher effectiveness in the self-evaluation of teaching competencies? The sample for Part One of the study consisted of 131 students enrolled in student teaching at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during the spring semester of 1980. Their respective supervising teachers were also involved. The student teachers provided self-evaluative data through their completion of the Instrument for the Self-Ranking of Teaching Skills (ISRTS) prior to the beginning of the spring semester and the Diagnostic Instrument for Student Teaching Performance (DISTP) during the fifth week of the semester. The supervising teachers provided evaluative data concerning the teaching performance of their respective student teachers through their completion of the DISTP during the fifth week. These data were analyzed through the use of Spearman rank correlation coefficients and chi-square tests. Four null hypotheses were tested for significance at the .05 level. Part Two of the study involved 56 student teachers and their respective supervising teachers. Of this number, the 28 student teachers assigned to the Louisiana State University Laboratory School along with their supervising teachers comprised the experimental group. The control group consisted of 28 student teachers assigned to off-campus student teaching locations and their respective supervising teachers. The student teachers and supervising teachers in both groups completed the DISTP during the fifth week of the semester. The experimental group of student teachers then received instruction in the use of the Self-Evaluation Instrument to be used in conjunction with the viewing of their own videotaped teaching performance. Each of the 28 experimental-group student teachers was videotaped during three separate 15 minute teaching segments at eight to ten day intervals. Each student teacher viewed his teaching segment and evaluated his performance by completing the Self-Evaluation Instrument on each occasion. The control-group student teachers were not videotaped and did not complete the Self-Evaluation Instrument. At the end of the semester, both groups of student teachers and supervising teachers again completed the DISTP. Three analysis of variance procedures were used to analyze the data. Nine null hypotheses were tested for significance at the .05 level. Interpretations of the data collected within this study led to the following conclusions: (1)The student teachers involved in this study were unable to predict and assess their teaching strengths and weaknesses. (2)An instructional sequence combined with the self-evaluation of their own videotaped teaching performance was not valuable in improving student teacher effectiveness in the self-evaluation of teaching competencies when corresponding supervising teacher ratings were used as the standard. (3)Student teachers perceived their teaching competencies to improve during the student teaching experience. (4)Differences in supervising teacher perceptions of effective teaching made a consensus regarding the degree of change experienced by student teachers difficult to achieve.

Pages

211

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