Date of Award

1981

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in the extent of educator stress were a function of the interaction between grade level taught, years experience, and level of job satisfaction. Data analysis was intended to reveal if differences in global stress scores of groups of educators assigned on the basis of selected variables were attributed to grade level taught, years of experience, and job satisfaction as a career choice. Educator responses were solicited concerning their attitudes toward stressful work related events thought to be associated with teaching. Educator responses were also obtained concerning grade level taught, years of experience in education, and whether or not they were satisfied with their careers in education. The subjects for this study consisted of graduate students enrolled in the Graduate Division of Education at Louisiana State University and extension classes off-campus. Each subject was assigned to one of eight groups on the basis of how each responded to a series of questions. One hundrend thirty-six subjects were then randomly selected from each of the eight groups to participate in the study. Each group included seventeen members. The Sources of Stress (SOS) Inventory was prepared after a review of the literature to determine stressful work related events which could be used to produce a global stress score. Permission of professors teaching graduate classes was obtained and educators were surveyed in thirty-one classes. Educator responses were categorized into eight groups: (1)Elementary educators with seven years or less experience who were satisfied with their careers in education, (2)elementary educators with more than seven years experience who were satisfied with their careers in education, (3)secondary educators with seven years or less experience who were satisfied with their careers in education, (4)secondary educators with more than seven years experience who were satisfied with their careers in education, (5)elementary educators with seven years or less experience who were dissatisfied with their careers in education, (6)elementary educators with more than seven years experience who were dissatisfied with their careers in education, (7)secondary educators with seven years or less experience who were dissatisfied with their careers in education, and (8)secondary educators with more than seven years experience who were dissatisfied with their careers in education. A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design was used. The data were analyzed by the analysis of variance method. The independent variables were grade level taught, years of experience in education, and level of job satisfaction as a career choice. There were two levels of each variable. The dependent variable was the global stress score on the SOS Inventory. Based upon the results obtained, it was concluded that: (1)There was no significant difference between groups of educators in extent of stress by grade level. The null hypothesis was accepted. (2)There was no significant difference between groups of educators in extent of stress by years of experience. The null hypothesis was accepted. (3)There was a significant difference between groups of educators in extent of stress by job satisfaction. The null hypothesis was rejected. This result indicated that level of job satisfaction in education produced a significant difference in stress scores of educators (F = 17.94, p < .05). (4)There was no significant interaction between grade level and years experience. The null hypothesis was accepted. (5)There was no significant interaction between grade level and job satisfaction. The null hypothesis was accepted. (6)There was no significant interaction between years of experience and job satisfaction. The null hypothesis was accepted. (7)There was no significant interaction among grade level, years of experience, and job satisfaction. This hypothesis was accepted.

Pages

74

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