Date of Award

1980

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Hypotheses derived from Beck's cognitive theory of depression were tested using 60 depressed and non-depressed males and females as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Subjects rated their performance before and after they received "positive," "negative," and "neutral" feedback regarding their performance on a social interaction task. They were also asked to recall feedback they received and explain reasons for their post-feedback self-rating. Results showed depressed males and females had a more negative evaluation of present circumstances and poorer memory for feedback. Further, depressed males lowered their self-evaluation upon feedback significantly more than did non-depressed males. In addition, depressed males showed significantly more cognitive distortions in their explanations of post-feedback ratings than did non-depressed males. Results regarding differential response to neutral and positive feedback were not found since subjects apparently perceived all levels of feedbacks as somewhat negative. Discussion concluded data were partially supportive of Beck's cognitive theory of depression, especially in regard to males. Implications for future research were discussed.

Pages

53

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