Date of Award

2001

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Chad D. Ellett

Second Advisor

Terry Geske

Abstract

This study examined relationships between sources of efficacy information available in teachers' professional learning environments and teacher self-, work-group collective and faculty collective efficacy beliefs. An argument is presented that teachers' individual and collective efficacy beliefs are vital factors that mediate linkages between professional learning and meaningful change in schools. School professional learning environments are hypothesized to provide efficacy information that may serve to enhance teachers' beliefs in their abilities to accomplish tasks that are linked to effective teaching and learning. Social cognitive theory and triadic reciprocal causation provided the framework for this research. Self-efficacy theory, a sub-theory of social cognitive theory, and studies of the sociopsychological characteristics of learning environments provided the conceptual foundation for the study. A critical review of the literature related to teacher self-efficacy beliefs was included. Additionally, two new measures were developed and used in this study. These included the three-part Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs System and the Sources of Efficacy Information in Professional Learning Environments Scale.

ISBN

9780493328348

Pages

282

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