Identifier

etd-06232011-172622

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Resource Education and Workforce Development

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Previous research indicates a positive relationship between creativity and entrepreneurship. Research also indicates a tendency for successful entrepreneurs to possess certain skills and abilities and to engage in activities that reflect their political astuteness. In addition, numerous studies have supported the importance of behavioral intentions as they relate to actions. Thus, this research endeavor focused on intentions, as it investigated the relationship between creativity and entrepreneurial intentions among female and male students, and attempted to determine whether political skill moderated the relationship. The results revealed that there was a statistically significant positive relationship between creativity and entrepreneurial intentions among both female and male undergraduate students. These results supported the findings of Olawale (2010), Hamidi et al. (2008), Zampetakis and Moustakis (2006), and other researchers in the literature, who concluded that creative students were more likely to have intentions of becoming entrepreneurs in the future. The results also revealed that although political skill did have a positive correlation with entrepreneurial intentions, it did not moderate the relationship between creativity and entrepreneurial intentions. It may be that a sample of undergraduate students does not possess sufficient diversity in terms of age and experience, for political skill to be fully understood, developed, and used, in order to affect the relationship between creativity and entrepreneurial intentions. The researcher concluded that the study should be replicated using older men and women at various stages of their lives, and women in “Women in Business” programs that are especially tailored to address the challenges and opportunities encountered by female entrepreneurs. Future research should also examine the political skill dimensions separately, to determine whether moderating effects exist for each dimension.

Date

2011

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

Burnett, Michael

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