Identifier

etd-04152009-093730

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of progressive lag reinforcement schedules to increase novel and appropriate verbal responses to academic skills for three children with language delays. The effect of visual cues on verbal responses was evaluated in conjunction with progressive lag reinforcement schedules using a multiple baseline with an embedded alternating treatments design. Basic research utilizing lag reinforcement schedules have shown to increase variable behavior in both animal and human participants; however, little research has been conducted to evaluate lag reinforcement schedules in applied settings. The results of this study preliminarily indicate that progressive lag reinforcement schedules are an effective and efficient method to increase variable behavior in applied settings. Experimental conditions with visual cues produced a slight overall increase in novel and appropriate verbal responses; however, this effect was not observed across all participants and baselines. The advantages and disadvantages of progressive lag reinforcement schedules and directions for future research are discussed.

Date

2009

Document Availability at the Time of Submission

Release the entire work immediately for access worldwide.

Committee Chair

George Noell

Included in

Psychology Commons

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